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Approved for foreign exchange student program
#21
Ahh, yes. That is an interesting point about Thailand, in contrast to European countries!
Regardless, congratulations! I wish you the best.

As for choosing countries, one thing to consider also is the language opportunity. Thailand will build experience in new and unseen systems of grammar; that is one big reason to consider it. Perhaps European language experience would be more useful, but there is potential interest there too: Laos speaks a language similar to Thai. Those countries could be sites of development in the future, if you are thinking that way, although more Laos than Thailand I think.
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#22
Yes, the Pacific rim will grow in the future. Japan is in the business of educating people for Asian commerce. They have colleges with mixed cultures. The nations cooperate with those and provide a student center for their students on campus. It's a very interesting set up. So there would be a ladder for a high school student to move into a college that is a leader in that aspect of global commerce.

Japan is a nice fit for American in culture, because we have a presence there. But, not all Japanese welcome Americans, because we have a presence there. So it's a double edged sword. There are businesses that say No Americans.

However, I'm sure a student exchange program would be fine. They would see that a proper placement is done. My nephew lived there almost two years. And, we travel there for business. South Korea is another Asian hub that's wild for American business. They have very unique office buildings, with English speaking staff to cater to Americans. They're on our stops too. South Korea is a portal or back door to China. Japan and China are still working out their differences.
Mrs. V
Grandmother/Caregiver of 8 -6 at home, 2 boys: Nicolaas15 & Gabe 5; 4 girls: Lisbeth 15, Natalie 14, Lizzie 10 & Ashleigh 8 - 2 girls away from home 22 & 17 (2 adult sons and 1 adult daughter, all single parents)
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#23
(09-14-2016, 03:53 PM)Vikinggene Wrote: There are businesses that say No Americans.

REALLY. Undecided I had no idea...
MICHAEL
Dad of 3 boys - Michael (19), Andrew (15), Daniel (13) and mentor to 1 boy - Jonathan (13)
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#24
It does depend on location; some places up north say "No Russians", because of the Russian sailors. Near US bases, one would probably see more signs like "No Americans". Away from that, the tension over foreigners probably gets less.
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#25
(09-14-2016, 02:46 PM)Vikinggene Wrote: I thought that was the case, Frankie. I suggested Chris get a copy of the agreement first. Some countries are real sticklers about corporal punishment. Some even use it in their court system. Of course, most of Europe is against CP. I would begin with the exchange program agreement first, before I even considered a country. Those groups vary in how they handle students and host families.

You're right about getting the program agreement.

Most of the "far East" countries as we used to call them use corporal punishment, I'm told, in school and at home, and some certainly as a judicial punishment (and not just for juveniles) too. I have had Indian, Korean Japanese and Malay colleagues who all experienced it (and the rattan cane which is the one used for punishment purposes) is native to those parts.

Though it is often associated with Islam, it seems in fact to be just as commonly used in India and in Chinese speaking, and Chinese influenced countries, where Islam is not necessarily a dominant force. An Indian exchange teacher expressed amazement when he discovered that caning had been abandoned in English schools: he could not imagine how we managed without it!

Our western reservations or anxieties about using corporal punishment seemed to be incomprehensible to people who assumed it to be a norm. We should perhaps remember that the West felt similarly until relatively recently. Maybe our current assumptions should be reconsidered? (I exclude members of this forum from "our", of course!)
FRANKIE
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#26
(09-14-2016, 02:46 PM)Vikinggene Wrote: I thought that was the case, Frankie. I suggested Chris get a copy of the agreement first. Some countries are real sticklers about corporal punishment. Some even use it in their court system. Of course, most of Europe is against CP. I would begin with the exchange program agreement first, before I even considered a country. Those groups vary in how they handle students and host families.

You're right about getting the program agreement.

Most of the "far East" countries as we used to call them use corporal punishment, I'm told, in school and at home, and some certainly as a judicial punishment (and not just for juveniles) too. I have had Indian, Korean Japanese and Malay colleagues who all experienced it and the rattan cane (the one used for punishment purposes) is native to those parts.

Though it is often associated with Islam, it seems in fact to be just as commonly used in India and in Chinese speaking, and Chinese influenced countries, where Islam is not necessarily a dominant force. An Indian exchange teacher expressed amazement when he discovered that caning had been abandoned in English schools: he could not imagine how we managed without it!

Our western reservations or anxieties about using corporal punishment seemed to be incomprehensible to people who assumed it to be a norm. We should perhaps remember that the West felt similarly until relatively recently. Maybe our current assumptions should be reconsidered? (I exclude members of this forum from "our", of course!)
FRANKIE
Father, Grandfather and Honorary Grandfather
Click for My Introduction
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#27
In India, they banned caning. But they haven't stopped much caning in schools, as yet. That's another thing to watch for. Some of these trade deals and UN programs reject a country from participating, unless they ban corporal punishment.

Places like India, passed a law that bans CP, sign the treaty and go on using CP anyway. They just regard it as an intrusion of the West on their culture and don't enforce the CP policy. So, you can't know for sure the home doesn't use CP, just because there's a national law against it.

They're like I have sign we don't legalize CP. Fine. Where do I sign? Education Minister Do we need to put a stop to CP, Mr President? Of course not, just LOOK like we do. There are similar practices throughout Africa.
Mrs. V
Grandmother/Caregiver of 8 -6 at home, 2 boys: Nicolaas15 & Gabe 5; 4 girls: Lisbeth 15, Natalie 14, Lizzie 10 & Ashleigh 8 - 2 girls away from home 22 & 17 (2 adult sons and 1 adult daughter, all single parents)
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#28
Congratulations Chris for the acceptance and to Kimberly for being such a great mom and being so proud of your son?

How do the two of you feel about the possibility of going to a country where corporal punishment could be a possibility in the home and/or school? Would this be acceptable if all other areas of the opportunity seemed to be a good fit? Kimberly would you be okay with a host family administering discipline of it was just as they provide for their own children/teens?

Jason
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#29
We have talked about it sir. Not decided as of yet. I know mom wants me to go to a family that is strict and rules that I have to follow. We already know that who ever they place me with will have a boy around my age so getting a brother for a few months sounds really awesome. As far as spankings in school and the home we haven't got into yet.
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#30
Sounds like a good plan so far.
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